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image: First, Do No Harm…

First, Do No Harm…

By | June 9, 2011

Is DNA damage an inevitable consequence of epigenetic reprogramming?

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image: Canned for whistleblowing?

Canned for whistleblowing?

By | June 9, 2011

Postdoc forced to leave position after questioning the reproducibility of advisor's data.

6 Comments

image: Control from Without

Control from Without

By | May 25, 2011

Editor's Choice in Developmental Biology

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image: Primal Fashion

Primal Fashion

By | May 20, 2011

Two sisters -- a developmental biologist and high-end fashion designer -- team up to develop a couture collection inspired by the first 1,000 hours of embryonic life.

3 Comments

Skeleton Keys

By | May 14, 2011

There are a surprising number of unknowns about how our limbs come to be symmetrical.

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image: Taking Shape

Taking Shape

By | April 1, 2011

Floral bouquets are the most ephemeral of presents. The puzzle of how flowers get their shape, however, is more enduring. 

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image: The Footprints of Winter

The Footprints of Winter

By | March 1, 2011

Epigenetic marks laid down during the cold months of the year allow flowering in spring and summer.

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Imprinting Diversity

By | March 1, 2011

Joachim Messing talks about how genomic imprinting may be a strong driver of diversity.

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Losers Fight Back

By | February 1, 2011

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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image: Myc, Nicked

Myc, Nicked

By | January 1, 2011

Editor's Choice in Developmental Biology

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