The Scientist

» drosophila, microbiology and evolution

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | September 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

By | September 1, 2015

A new approach shows how both honesty and deception are stable features of noisy communication.

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image: Hear and Now

Hear and Now

By | September 1, 2015

Auditory research advances worth shouting about

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image: Aural History

Aural History

By | September 1, 2015

The form and function of the ears of modern land vertebrates cannot be understood without knowing how they evolved.

1 Comment

image: The Great Big Clean-Up

The Great Big Clean-Up

By | September 1, 2015

From tossing out cross-contaminated cell lines to flagging genomic misnomers, a push is on to tidy up biomedical research.

5 Comments

image: Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

By | August 26, 2015

The fungal and bacterial communities in household dust can reveal some details about a building’s inhabitants.

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image: Bacteria to Blame?

Bacteria to Blame?

By | August 18, 2015

T cells activated in the microbe-dense gut can spark an autoimmune eye disease, a study shows. 

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image: Fending Off Infection in Future Generations

Fending Off Infection in Future Generations

By | August 17, 2015

Female fruit flies challenged with infection during their lifetimes have offspring with greater genetic diversity.

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image: Fruit-Fly Neurons in Action

Fruit-Fly Neurons in Action

By | August 12, 2015

Researchers visualize the complete nervous system of a Drosophila melanogaster larva at nearly single-neuron resolution.

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image: The Search for Persisters

The Search for Persisters

By | August 11, 2015

Lyme disease–causing bacteria can outmaneuver antibiotics in vitro and manipulate the mouse immune system.

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