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image: A Bacterial Messenger Molecule Extends Healthspan

A Bacterial Messenger Molecule Extends Healthspan

By | August 28, 2017

E. coli that make indoles protect older worms, flies, and mice from frailty. 

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Surrounded by a projection screen, a fly’s flight path is influenced by a collection of moving dots.

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image: Virtual Reality for Freely Moving Animals

Virtual Reality for Freely Moving Animals

By | August 21, 2017

Experiments that place untethered fish, flies, and mice in simulated environments give clues about the animals’ social behavior.

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image: Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

By | August 18, 2017

A memory B cell response to Zika virus in dengue-infected patients produced antibodies that were poorly neutralizing in vitro and instead enhanced infection.

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image: Image of the Day: Everybody Needs a Friend

Image of the Day: Everybody Needs a Friend

By | August 10, 2017

The protein encoded by the gene that causes Fragile X in humans partners with another protein, dNab2, to alter gene expression in fruit fly neurons.

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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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