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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: How Bacteria in Flies Kill Parasitic Wasps

How Bacteria in Flies Kill Parasitic Wasps

By | July 10, 2017

Ribosome-inactivating proteins from symbiotic bacteria leave their hosts unharmed.

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image: Image of the Day: Oculus Reparo

Image of the Day: Oculus Reparo

By | July 10, 2017

Following an injury to a Drosophila pupal wing, macrophages swoop in, engulfing debris and aiding in the tissue regeneration process.

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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image: Lords of the Flies

Lords of the Flies

By | June 19, 2017

Biologists’ walk in the woods sparks the creation of a masterful fruit fly field guide. 

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

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