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image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

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image: Image of the Day: Mitochondria, Live and in Color

Image of the Day: Mitochondria, Live and in Color

By | September 27, 2017

Mitochondria age differently depending upon whether they’re located in the liver, heart, or kidney, scientists find in flies and mice.

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image: CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

By | September 20, 2017

OCT4 is necessary for blastocyst formation in the human embryo, researchers report.

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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: Scientists Fear DACA Cancellation

Scientists Fear DACA Cancellation

By and | September 4, 2017

Some researchers are at risk of job loss and even deportation if Trump decides to end a program that allows undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children to obtain work permits. 

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image: Baby on Board

Baby on Board

By | September 1, 2017

Many scientific conferences offer child care options that allow researchers to bring their families along for the trip.

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image: Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a surface protein on endosomes is key to the organelles’ uneven distribution in daughter cells.

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image: Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a protein called Sara found on the surface of endosomes appears to be a key regulator of asymmetric splitting in fruit flies.

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image: A Bacterial Messenger Molecule Extends Healthspan

A Bacterial Messenger Molecule Extends Healthspan

By | August 28, 2017

E. coli that make indoles protect older worms, flies, and mice from frailty. 

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Surrounded by a projection screen, a fly’s flight path is influenced by a collection of moving dots.

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