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image: What Made Human Brains So Big?

What Made Human Brains So Big?

By Ashley Yeager | May 24, 2018

Ecological challenges such as finding food and creating fire may have led the organ to become abnormally large, a new computer model suggests.

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The agency says it has taken various steps to ensure the privacy of participants’ data. 

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Power of Rare</em>

Book Excerpt from The Power of Rare

By Victoria Jackson and Michael Yeaman | May 1, 2018

In chapter 4, “Building a Cure Machine,” author Victoria Jackson reveals the challenges in launching a foundation focused on funding research on a rare disease.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: Image of the Day: Gene Expression

Image of the Day: Gene Expression

By The Scientist Staff | April 9, 2018

A new algorithm scrutinizes the most hard-to-read segments of the genome.

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image: A Neuroscientist’s Journey Through Madness

A Neuroscientist’s Journey Through Madness

By Barbara Lipska with Elaine McArdle | April 1, 2018

After I was diagnosed with brain cancer and started to lose my mental health, the importance of my job came into clear focus.

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image: Kathy Matthews, <em>Drosophila</em> Geneticist, Dies

Kathy Matthews, Drosophila Geneticist, Dies

By Kerry Grens | March 20, 2018

For decades, Matthews led two important repositories for fruit fly research: the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center and FlyBase.  

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In Drosophila, the tissue is more permeable to drugs at night, offering a possible explanation for why some medicines work better at certain times of day.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | March 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in Flies

Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in Flies

By Kerry Grens | February 28, 2018

Previously considered immobile, these cells swoop in to seal epithelial holes and clean up cellular detritus.  

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