The Scientist

» sequencing and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: MERS Sequence Analysis

MERS Sequence Analysis

By | June 11, 2015

The strain of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus currently circulating in South Korea is highly similar to the one in the pathogen’s namesake region.

0 Comments

image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

0 Comments

image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: 2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

By | April 13, 2015

Submissions are officially open for this year’s Top 10 Innovations contest.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Hiding in Plain Sight

Hiding in Plain Sight

By | March 31, 2015

Researchers using metagenomics and single-cell sequencing identify a potential new bacterial phylum.

1 Comment

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

0 Comments

image: Subway Microbiome

Subway Microbiome

By | February 9, 2015

Researchers document the bacterial life living among New York City’s transit stations.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Man Receives First In Vivo Gene-Editing Therapy
  2. Researchers Build a Cancer Immunotherapy Without Immune Cells
  3. Long-term Study Finds That the Pesticide Glyphosate Does Not Cause Cancer
  4. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

RayBiotech