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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By Jef Akst | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Mice Develop with Human Stem Cells

Mice Develop with Human Stem Cells

By Karen Zusi | December 21, 2015

Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells participated normally in early mouse embryo development in a recent study.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By The Scientist Staff | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By Karen Zusi | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By The Scientist Staff | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: The Regenerator

The Regenerator

By Anna Azvolinsky | December 1, 2015

In his search for effective therapies for Parkinson’s disease, Lorenz Studer is uncovering pluripotency switches and clues to what makes cells age.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By Jef Akst | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By Bob Grant | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Stem Cell Similarities

Stem Cell Similarities

By Karen Zusi | October 28, 2015

Human induced pluripotent stem cells appear functionally equivalent to stem cells from embryos in a study.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By Karen Zusi | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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