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image: Darwin Goes Digital

Darwin Goes Digital

By Jessica P. Johnson | June 24, 2011

Much of Charles Darwin’s personal library–both his books and what he wrote within them--is now available online.

6 Comments

image: Sleep on it

Sleep on it

By Megan Scudellari | June 23, 2011

Scientists invent a method to control the timing and duration of sleep in fruit flies and find that snoozing helps form long-term memories.

9 Comments

image: Summit Science

Summit Science

By Alison Snyder | June 20, 2011

Researchers seeking a link between vision problems and the dangerous physiological effects of hypoxia in mountain climbers are taking their work to new heights.

6 Comments

image: Head trauma in the funny pages

Head trauma in the funny pages

By Richard P. Grant | June 17, 2011

Researchers are using real-world methods to study traumatic brain injuries in a comic book.

0 Comments

image: Stress births neural stem cells

Stress births neural stem cells

By Jessica P. Johnson | June 15, 2011

When mice are held in isolation, stem cells in the hippocampus make more of themselves and wait for better times.

0 Comments

image: 2011 World Science Festival: A look back

2011 World Science Festival: A look back

By The Scientist Staff | June 10, 2011

The Scientist covered some of the events that made this year's festival memorable.

0 Comments

image: Primal Fashion

Primal Fashion

By Cristina Luiggi | June 9, 2011

Two sisters—Kate, a developmental biologist, and Helen, a high-end fashion designer—team up to develop a couture collection inspired by the first 1,000 hours of embryonic life. 

0 Comments

image: Hard and Harder

Hard and Harder

By Michael K. Gusmano | June 5, 2011

The path to eradicating malaria in Africa involves much more than just a vaccine.

18 Comments

In Chapter 9, "We Were Hunted, Which is Why All of Us are Afraid Some of the Time and Some of Us are Afraid All of the Time," author Rob Dunn explains how predators shaped our evolution as we cowered and ran from their ravenous maws.

0 Comments

image: One-Man NIH, 1887

One-Man NIH, 1887

By Cristina Luiggi | June 4, 2011

As epidemics swept across the United States in the 19th century, the US government recognized the pressing need for a national lab dedicated to the study of infectious disease. 

27 Comments

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