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Micro Farmers

By Cristina Luiggi | May 1, 2011

Dustin Rubenstein discusses how the discovery of amoebas that farm their own food links the development of agriculture with the evolution of social behavior.

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Viral Hijackers

By Hannah Waters | April 1, 2011

Editor's choice in immunology

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Truly Phenome-nal

By Hannah Waters | April 1, 2011

Editor's choice in microbiology

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Family Affair

By Megan Scudellari | April 1, 2011

In discovering their shared ancestry, a distantly related animal geneticist and plant pathologist find a common thread in their work on immune receptors.

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Come Inside

By Richard P. Grant | March 1, 2011

Editor's choice in immunology

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Epigenetics and Society

By Andrew D. Ellington | March 1, 2011

Did Erasmus Darwin foreshadow the tweaking of his grandson’s paradigm?

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Ready, Reset, Go

By Karen Hopkin | March 1, 2011

Rudolf Jaenisch enjoys climbing mountains, rafting rapids, and unraveling the secrets of pluripotency—knowledge that could someday lead to personalized regenerative medicine.

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image: Epigenetics—A Primer

Epigenetics—A Primer

By Stefan Kubicek | March 1, 2011

There are many ways that epigenetic effects regulate the activation or repression of genes. Here are a few molecular tricks cells use to read off the right genetic program.

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Resistant to Failure

By Cristina Luiggi | March 1, 2011

A Duke University researcher survives a sticky situation at a federal research institution to make major strides in determining the genetic roots of Staphylococcus aureus antibiotic resistance.

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image: The Great Escape

The Great Escape

By Richard P. Grant | February 1, 2011

  Editor's choice in microbiology  

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