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image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: Waste-Management Consultant

Waste-Management Consultant

By | November 1, 2013

By audaciously pursuing an abandoned area of research, Ana María Cuervo discovered how cells selectively break down their waste, and revealed the health consequences when that process malfunctions.

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Autophagy’s Role in Alzheimer’s

Autophagy’s Role in Alzheimer’s

By | October 3, 2013

Researchers show that amyloid beta is secreted from neurons in an autophagy-dependent manner.

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image: Citations Predict Nobel Winners?

Citations Predict Nobel Winners?

By | September 25, 2013

Thomson Reuters makes its annual data-based picks for which scientists could collect medals in Stockholm later this year.

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image: Fixing Fly Forgetfulness

Fixing Fly Forgetfulness

By | September 3, 2013

Polyamines help fruit flies retain memories as they age.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

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