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A group of around 300 whales produced 184 distinct songs over just a few years, according to a new study.

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image: A Neuroscientist’s Journey Through Madness

A Neuroscientist’s Journey Through Madness

By Barbara Lipska with Elaine McArdle | April 1, 2018

After I was diagnosed with brain cancer and started to lose my mental health, the importance of my job came into clear focus.

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Social insects kill infected individuals for the benefit of the colony—and now a study has shown how they know who’s sick.

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A controversial hypothesis suggests that jellyfish may one day rule the oceans, and Mola mola may tell us if we are approaching a tipping point.

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image: Image of the Day: Hungry Hookworms

Image of the Day: Hungry Hookworms

By The Scientist Staff | March 26, 2018

Researchers discover anti-malarials called quinolones can halt the development of the parasites, offering a potential therapeutic avenue.

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image: Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

By Catherine Offord | March 22, 2018

Researchers pinpoint a protein that can metabolize at least one of the insecticides, highlighting a route to identifying compounds that are friendlier to the critical pollinators.

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Host slugs given Prozac to increase their serotonin levels no longer avoid parasitic nematodes, the same behavior seen in infected slugs.

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In an unusual evolutionary twist, local stick spiders have come up with an almost identical repertoire of color morphs in multiple locations.

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image: Social Dominance Comes At a Cost

Social Dominance Comes At a Cost

By Richard Kemeny | March 5, 2018

Dominant male mammals are particularly at risk of infection by parasites.

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image: Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

By Anna Azvolinsky | March 1, 2018

After discovering a novel organelle found in protozoan parasites, the University of Pennsylvania’s Roos created a widely used eukaryotic pathogen database.

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