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» parasite, evolution and neuroscience

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image: New Oldest Fossils

New Oldest Fossils

By | August 22, 2011

Fossils discovered in Australian rocks may be the remnants of three and a half billion-year-old microorganisms.

3 Comments

image: Parasite Spurs Rat Sexual Frenzy

Parasite Spurs Rat Sexual Frenzy

By | August 19, 2011

The parasite Toxoplasma gondii furthers its transmission by making rats go wild for the scent of cat urine.

3 Comments

image: Next Generation: Electronic Skin

Next Generation: Electronic Skin

By | August 17, 2011

Tiny, flexible electronic chips embedded in a skin-like material monitor vitals and stimulate muscles.

3 Comments

image: Oldest Known Wood

Oldest Known Wood

By | August 12, 2011

Two newly described fossils suggest that wood is some 10 million years older than previous believed.

3 Comments

image: Yeast Don't Need Oxygen

Yeast Don't Need Oxygen

By | August 11, 2011

Scientists discover that ancestors of the unicellular fungi can synthesize essential biomolecules with only trace levels of O2.

27 Comments

image: Why Have Twins?

Why Have Twins?

By | August 11, 2011

Mothers more likely to have twins have heavier, healthier non-twin babies, possibly explaining why twinning evolved.

6 Comments

image: Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

By | August 9, 2011

More than 100 researchers have left a neuroscience institute in Brazil in the last couple of weeks, protesting managerial problems they say are thwarting their work.

21 Comments

image: Rats Don't Map Altitude

Rats Don't Map Altitude

By | August 8, 2011

Rat neurons only weakly respond as the animals climbed upwards, suggesting the brain's map of the environment doesn't account for altitude.

9 Comments

image: Rewriting <em>E. coli</em>’s Genetic Code

Rewriting E. coli’s Genetic Code

By | August 5, 2011

Researchers use directed evolution to create a bacterial strain that substitutes a synthetic base for thymine.

6 Comments

image: How Vampire Bats Find Veins

How Vampire Bats Find Veins

By | August 4, 2011

Heat-sensing protein channels in vampire bats allow the flying mammals to find the best place to sink their teeth into their prey.

12 Comments

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