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Though Calliope Joy’s disease is too far progressed to be treatable, her parents have helped other children with metachromatic leukodystrophy get access to an experimental therapy.

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A new technique reveals certain neuronal connections grow larger and denser when memories are made.

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image: Worms’ Magnetic Sense Questioned

Worms’ Magnetic Sense Questioned

By Abby Olena | April 25, 2018

Unsuccessful attempts to reproduce the results of a 2015 study reporting that C. elegans orient themselves by Earth’s magnetic field spark debate among researchers.

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image: Preterm Labor May Be Sparked by Fetal Immune Reaction

Preterm Labor May Be Sparked by Fetal Immune Reaction

By Ruth Williams | April 25, 2018

Immune cells targeting maternal antigens are abundant in the blood of premature infants, suggesting fetal intolerance of mom may instigate early labor.  

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image: Exercise Warms the Brain, Causing Mice to Eat Less

Exercise Warms the Brain, Causing Mice to Eat Less

By Kerry Grens | April 24, 2018

Directly activating a heat sensor also sensitive to capsaicin in chili peppers in the hypothalamus had the same effect as exercise.

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The 20-year project calls into question the conventional wisdom about the role plants will play in mitigating future climate change.

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image: Male Fruit Flies Take Pleasure in Having Sex

Male Fruit Flies Take Pleasure in Having Sex

By Jim Daley | April 20, 2018

Sex-deprived males seek out alcohol.

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image: Children With Malaria Smell More Attractive to Mosquitoes

Children With Malaria Smell More Attractive to Mosquitoes

By Shawna Williams | April 17, 2018

The parasite changes people’s scent, primarily due to an increase in aldehydes.

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A new report estimates that 95 percent of people live in areas with dangerously high levels of fine particulate matter such as dust and soot.

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image: Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains

Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains

By Ashley Yeager | April 16, 2018

After implantation, the tissue developed blood vessels and became integrated into neuronal networks in the animals’ brains.

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