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image: Culprit for Antibody Blockade Identified

Culprit for Antibody Blockade Identified

By Amanda B. Keener | October 21, 2016

Type I interferon organizes several immune mechanisms to suppress B cell responses to a chronic viral infection.

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image: Q&A: Sequencing Newborns

Q&A: Sequencing Newborns

By Tracy Vence | October 21, 2016

Members of the BabySeq Project discuss trial enrollment, preliminary findings.

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image: Week in Review: October 17–21

Week in Review: October 17–21

By Jef Akst | October 21, 2016

Report finds that pathologist involved in anonymous defamation case committed multiple acts of misconduct; growing eggs from stem cells; neutrophils’ role in metastasis; convergent evolution in birds

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image: Common STD May Have Come from Neanderthals

Common STD May Have Come from Neanderthals

By Bob Grant | October 20, 2016

Cross-species trysts likely spread human papillomavirus (HPV) to Homo sapiens, according to new research.

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image: Exome Dataset Expands to Whole Genome

Exome Dataset Expands to Whole Genome

By Tracy Vence | October 19, 2016

Members of the Exome Aggregation Consortium launch the Genome Aggregation Database.

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image: Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

By Ruth Williams | October 19, 2016

Researchers discover that neutrophil extracellular traps help cancers spread, and design enzyme-loaded nanoparticles to destroy them.

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image: Promiscuous Mice Have Extra-Fast Sperm

Promiscuous Mice Have Extra-Fast Sperm

By Jef Akst | October 19, 2016

The tails of polygamous deer mice sperm have longer midsections than the sperm tails of monogamous individuals of a similar species, and this correlates with improved swimming and competitive ability.

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image: Cellular Cartography

Cellular Cartography

By Jef Akst | October 18, 2016

Researchers launch an initiative to generate a complete atlas of all cells in the human body.

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image: Black Widow Secrets in Phage Genome

Black Widow Secrets in Phage Genome

By Jef Akst | October 12, 2016

In the DNA of the WO phage, which infects arthropod-inhabiting Wolbachia, researchers find sequences related to a black widow spider’s toxin and other animal genes.

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Ambry Genetics CEO Aaron Elliott discusses his team’s recent analysis of 20,000 clinical next-generation sequencing panels.

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