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image: Cortical Interneurons Show Layer-Specific Activities

Cortical Interneurons Show Layer-Specific Activities

By | March 2, 2017

Researchers examine the firing patterns of interneurons throughout all layers of the somatosensory cortices of alert mice.  

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image: How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

By | February 28, 2017

Scientists identify the genes responsible for bacteria-controlled sterility in arthropods.

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While the University Grants Commission’s system prioritizes peer-reviewed papers, experts not involved in the initiative express concern that it could incentivize cheating.

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image: Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation

Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation

By | February 16, 2017

Family members of Lacks, the donor behind the widely used HeLa cell line, are planning to sue Johns Hopkins University.

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image: Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

By | February 1, 2017

Nonliving cells developed in the lab can communicate chemically with living bacteria, according to a study.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

By | February 1, 2017

Warmth acts on a light-sensing protein similarly to the way shade does, setting off a growth spurt in plant seedlings.

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image: Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

By | February 1, 2017

See how different environmental conditions affect the activity of a molecule sensitive to both light and temperature.

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image: Infographic: Following the Force

Infographic: Following the Force

By | February 1, 2017

Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.

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image: RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

By | February 1, 2017

Plants and fungi can use conserved RNA interference machinery to regulate each other’s gene expression—and scientists think they can make use of this phenomenon to create a new generation of pesticides.

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