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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

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image: CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

By | September 20, 2017

OCT4 is necessary for blastocyst formation in the human embryo, researchers report.

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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: Scientists Fear DACA Cancellation

Scientists Fear DACA Cancellation

By and | September 4, 2017

Some researchers are at risk of job loss and even deportation if Trump decides to end a program that allows undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children to obtain work permits. 

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image: Opinion: Tales from the Nonacademic Career Path

Opinion: Tales from the Nonacademic Career Path

By | September 3, 2017

Graduate students from The Scripps Research Institute share how they prepared to enter policy, law, biotech, and beyond.

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Overseeing assistant professors tasked with teaching freshmen how to conduct research revealed crucial gaps in STEM doctoral education. 

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image: Big Gender Gaps in Salk Institute Faculty: Report

Big Gender Gaps in Salk Institute Faculty: Report

By | August 23, 2017

Authored by Salk PIs, the study claims women attract more federal funding, yet have smaller labs and receive less support from the institute.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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The Stanford University psychiatrist and neuroscientist known for his contributions to optogenetics and tissue clearing is awarded €4 million by the Fresenius Research Prize.

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