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image: Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

By | February 18, 2016

Oligosaccharides found in breast milk stimulate the activity of gut bacteria, promoting growth in two animal models of infant malnutrition.

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image: More Mini Brains

More Mini Brains

By | February 17, 2016

Simple versions of brain organoids could serve as new models for testing the effects of drugs, researchers reported at this year’s AAAS meeting. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

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image: Infection-Autism Link Explained?

Infection-Autism Link Explained?

By | January 31, 2016

A mouse study suggests a mechanism by which severe infections during pregnancy increase autism risk. 

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image: Engineered Monkeys Could Aid Autism Research

Engineered Monkeys Could Aid Autism Research

By | January 27, 2016

Monkeys genetically engineered with multiple copies of an autism-linked human gene display some autism-like behaviors, scientists show.

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image: $280 Million Boost for Disease Genomics

$280 Million Boost for Disease Genomics

By | January 18, 2016

The genomics arm of the National Institutes of Health has pledged a total of $280 million for research into the genetic bases of disease.

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image: Counting Cells

Counting Cells

By | January 11, 2016

A person likely carries the same number of human and microbial cells, according to a new estimate.

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