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The Scientist

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By Ruth Williams | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: More Mini Brains

More Mini Brains

By Jef Akst | February 17, 2016

Simple versions of brain organoids could serve as new models for testing the effects of drugs, researchers reported at this year’s AAAS meeting. 

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image: Infection-Autism Link Explained?

Infection-Autism Link Explained?

By Jef Akst | January 31, 2016

A mouse study suggests a mechanism by which severe infections during pregnancy increase autism risk. 

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image: Engineered Monkeys Could Aid Autism Research

Engineered Monkeys Could Aid Autism Research

By Catherine Offord | January 27, 2016

Monkeys genetically engineered with multiple copies of an autism-linked human gene display some autism-like behaviors, scientists show.

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image: $280 Million Boost for Disease Genomics

$280 Million Boost for Disease Genomics

By Catherine Offord | January 18, 2016

The genomics arm of the National Institutes of Health has pledged a total of $280 million for research into the genetic bases of disease.

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image: One Gene, Two Disorders

One Gene, Two Disorders

By Karen Zusi | December 11, 2015

Researchers link different mutations in a single gene to autistic and schizophrenic phenotypes in mice.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By Karen Zusi | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By Bob Grant | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By Karen Zusi | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Rewarding Companions

Rewarding Companions

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | October 26, 2015

Oxytocin and social contact together modulate endocannabinoid activity in the mouse brain, which could help explain the prosocial effects of marijuana use. 

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