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Scientists are beginning to unravel the ways in which we develop a healthy relationship with the bugs in our bodies.

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image: Scientists Continue to Use Outdated Methods

Scientists Continue to Use Outdated Methods

By | January 9, 2018

The use of underperforming computational tools is a major offender in science’s reproducibility crisis—and there’s growing momentum to avoid it.

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image: <em>PNAS</em> Editor-in-Chief Placed on Leave

PNAS Editor-in-Chief Placed on Leave

By | January 5, 2018

In a gender discrmination lawsuit against the Salk Institute, a female scientist alleges that biologist Inder Verma was dismissive of his female colleagues. 

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Fazlul Sarkar had unsuccessfully sued PubPeer to reveal the identity of a commenter who accused him of research misconduct.

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image: A Turbulent Year in the Publishing World

A Turbulent Year in the Publishing World

By | December 15, 2017

In 2017, scientists, regulators, and publishers clashed in a series of lawsuits, boycotts, mass resignations, and more.

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image: Max Planck Society Seeks to Keep More Women as Faculty

Max Planck Society Seeks to Keep More Women as Faculty

By | December 6, 2017

The German research institution will invest more than $35 million in creating tenure-track positions for female scientists. 

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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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image: Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

By | December 1, 2017

Brazilian researchers report a relatively large diversity of fungi in marine ecosystems surrounding Antarctica, but warn that climate change could bring unpleasant surprises.

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The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researcher’s work will help predict how the Arctic is responding to climate change—and the global effects of those changes.

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