The Scientist

» science publishing and immunology

Most Recent

image: The Top 10 Retractions of 2014

The Top 10 Retractions of 2014

By | December 23, 2014

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

5 Comments

image: Repurposed Retroviruses

Repurposed Retroviruses

By | December 18, 2014

B cells have commandeered ancient viral sequences in the genome to transmit antigen signals.

0 Comments

image: Platelets Fan Inflammation

Platelets Fan Inflammation

By | December 4, 2014

The circulating blood cells bind to neutrophils, prompting inflammation-related activity in these immune cell partners.

0 Comments

image: Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

By | December 4, 2014

A carbohydrate antigen found on cells of E. coli and other species prompts a potent immune response against malaria-causing parasites in mice.

1 Comment

image: <em>Nature</em> Opens the Archives

Nature Opens the Archives

By | December 3, 2014

Users will be able to access articles dating back to 1869 from the journal and its sister titles, but cannot copy, print, or download the materials.

0 Comments

image: All Systems Go

All Systems Go

By | December 1, 2014

Alan Aderem earned his PhD while under house arrest for protesting apartheid in South Africa. His early political involvement has guided his scientific focus, encouraging fellow systems biologists to study immunology and infectious diseases.

0 Comments

image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.

0 Comments

image: Retiring Congressman to Lead AAAS

Retiring Congressman to Lead AAAS

By | November 19, 2014

Rush Holt, a research physicist and former teacher who is leaving the US House of Representatives, will become executive publisher of the Science journals.

0 Comments

image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

0 Comments

image: Snail Revival Raises Peer Review Debate

Snail Revival Raises Peer Review Debate

By | October 15, 2014

Rediscovery of a snail thought to be extinct has raised questions about the peer-review process that approved the publication of the extinction report.

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  2. 2017 Top 10 Innovations
    Features 2017 Top 10 Innovations

    From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year’s best new products shine on many levels.

  3. Search for Life on the Red Planet
  4. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
FreeShip