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» science publishing, ecology and neuroscience

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image: Beetle Mania

Beetle Mania

By Edyta Zielinska | August 25, 2011

Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences was crawling with bugs, and The Scientist went down to join in the fun.

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image: Dengue-Resistant Mosquitoes

Dengue-Resistant Mosquitoes

By Tia Ghose | August 24, 2011

Mosquitoes infected with the Wolbachia bacteria, which fail to transmit the dengue virus, spread through the population when released in the wild.

15 Comments

image: EPA to Address Nitrogen Pollution

EPA to Address Nitrogen Pollution

By Cristina Luiggi | August 23, 2011

The federal agency should reduce harmful nitrogen emissions by 25 percent in the next two decades, a new report says.

0 Comments

image: Top 7 in Neuroscience

Top 7 in Neuroscience

By Tia Ghose | August 23, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in neuroscience, from Faculty of 1000

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image: Next Generation: Electronic Skin

Next Generation: Electronic Skin

By Jessica P. Johnson | August 17, 2011

Tiny, flexible electronic chips embedded in a skin-like material monitor vitals and stimulate muscles.

3 Comments

image: Q&A: The Impact of Retractions

Q&A: The Impact of Retractions

By Tia Ghose | August 11, 2011

Is the pressure of the publish-or-perish mentality driving more researchers to commit misconduct?

27 Comments

image: Fair Trade at Plant Roots

Fair Trade at Plant Roots

By Kerry Grens | August 11, 2011

Plant and fungal symbionts swap more resources with partners that provide a greater return of nutrients.

3 Comments

image: Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

By Jef Akst | August 9, 2011

More than 100 researchers have left a neuroscience institute in Brazil in the last couple of weeks, protesting managerial problems they say are thwarting their work.

21 Comments

image: Rats Don't Map Altitude

Rats Don't Map Altitude

By Jef Akst | August 8, 2011

Rat neurons only weakly respond as the animals climbed upwards, suggesting the brain's map of the environment doesn't account for altitude.

9 Comments

image: How Vampire Bats Find Veins

How Vampire Bats Find Veins

By Jessica P. Johnson | August 4, 2011

Heat-sensing protein channels in vampire bats allow the flying mammals to find the best place to sink their teeth into their prey.

12 Comments

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