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Contributors

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By Ruth Williams | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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Six-Legged Syringes

By Yao-Hua Law | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By Yao-Hua Law | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

2 Comments

image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.

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image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By Mark A. Genung, Jennifer A. Schweitzer, and Joseph K. Bailey | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

8 Comments

image: Subglacial Ecosystem

Subglacial Ecosystem

By Jef Akst | August 22, 2014

Samples from an Antarctic lake 800 meters below the ice reveal an abundance of microbial life.

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image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

1 Comment

image: Super Sniffers?

Super Sniffers?

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | July 24, 2014

African elephants have more genes for olfactory receptors than dogs or humans, a study shows. 

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