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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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image: Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

By | March 2, 2016

The genome of a mimivirus strain resistant to a virophage has repeated phage sequences alongside nuclease- and helicase-coding sections.

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image: Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

By | March 1, 2016

Research Fellow, Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liège. Age: 35

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image: Learning with the Lights Out

Learning with the Lights Out

By | March 1, 2016

Researchers are uncovering the link between sleep and learning and how it changes throughout our lives.

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image: Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

By | February 25, 2016

Clinical cases link immune changes to a cancer’s spread through the body, but find no role for so-called “driver” mutations.

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image: Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

By | February 25, 2016

The “just right” binding properties of a monoclonal antibody from an Ebolavirus survivor help it neutralize the virus.

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image: Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

By | February 24, 2016

Compounds typically used to calm the immune system can prevent death from scorpion venom in mice, researchers report.

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image: Neuroscience of Early-Life Learning in <em>C. elegans</em>

Neuroscience of Early-Life Learning in C. elegans

By | February 11, 2016

Scientists identify the brain circuits with which newly hatched nematodes form and retrieve a lifelong aversive olfactory memory.

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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