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image: Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

By | September 6, 2017

Sweet taste receptor-activating molecules produced by sinus microbes suppress the local innate immune system in humans.

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image: Studies: Ketogenic Mice Live Longer, Healthier Lives

Studies: Ketogenic Mice Live Longer, Healthier Lives

By | September 5, 2017

High-fat, low-carbohydrate diets are shown to increase lifespan and preserve memory in two independent mouse experiments.

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image: An Immunological Timeline for Pregnancy

An Immunological Timeline for Pregnancy

By | September 1, 2017

A new study uses blood samples from pregnant women to track changes in the immune system leading up to birth, and predicts gestational age from the mothers’ immune signatures.

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image: How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

By | September 1, 2017

A study traces proteins’ evolution from the immune to the olfactory system.

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image: Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

By | September 1, 2017

The once fringe idea is gaining traction among the scientific community.

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Emerging evidence links bacterial or viral infection with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

By | August 18, 2017

A memory B cell response to Zika virus in dengue-infected patients produced antibodies that were poorly neutralizing in vitro and instead enhanced infection.

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image: Image of the Day: Rainbow Matter

Image of the Day: Rainbow Matter

By | August 14, 2017

Using diffusion-weighted tractography, scientists can produce a detailed image of the minute neural fibers within a mouse brain.  

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image: The Sleeping Brain Can Learn

The Sleeping Brain Can Learn

By | August 8, 2017

Humans can remember new sensory information presented during REM sleep, but this ability is suppressed during deep, slow-wave slumber.

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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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