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image: Image of the Day: Van Gogh Microscopy

Image of the Day: Van Gogh Microscopy

By The Scientist Staff | January 10, 2018

Scientists identify the cells that give rise to the soft tissue cancer rhabdomyosarcoma. 

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image: Image of the Day: Minions of the Cicada 

Image of the Day: Minions of the Cicada 

By The Scientist Staff | January 9, 2018

Scientists study the unusual genome evolution of the bacteria that live within a genus of cicadas. 

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image: Image of the Day: See You Later!

Image of the Day: See You Later!

By The Scientist Staff | January 8, 2018

Developmental biologists take a close look at how alligator embryos grow. 

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image: Coriell Institute CEO Dies

Coriell Institute CEO Dies

By Kerry Grens | January 4, 2018

Michael Christman oversaw the organization’s well-known biobank and pioneered a personalized medicine initiative.

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image: Alcohol Damages Mouse DNA

Alcohol Damages Mouse DNA

By Jef Akst | January 3, 2018

A byproduct of alcohol consumption causes mutations in the DNA of mouse blood stem cells, and some of the breaks are not repaired.

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After an initial wounding, genes needed for repair remain ready for action.

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image: Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

By Abby Olena | December 19, 2017

Syrian hamsters and thirteen-lined ground squirrels are tolerant of chilly temperatures, thanks to amino acid changes in a cold-responsive ion channel. 

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image: Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

By The Scientist Staff | December 18, 2017

Entomologists have rediscovered a species of moth that was considered lost for 130 years. 

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image: Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?

Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?

By Shawna Williams | December 11, 2017

Small trials using younger donors and elderly recipients hint that mesenchymal stem cell transfers might reduce frailty. 

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Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

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