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image: First Stem-Cell-Organ Transplant

First Stem-Cell-Organ Transplant

By | July 13, 2011

A fully-functional tooth grown from stem cells is successfully implanted into a mouse.

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image: Circadian Signs of Aging

Circadian Signs of Aging

By | July 13, 2011

The neural nexus of the circadian clock shows signs of functional decline as mice age, providing clues as to why sleep patterns tend to change as people grow older.

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image: Contact Allergies May Help Stymie Cancer

Contact Allergies May Help Stymie Cancer

By | July 12, 2011

New data suggests that skin rashes are associated with lower risk of developing certain cancers.

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image: Cough Syrup Treats MS?

Cough Syrup Treats MS?

By | July 11, 2011

Researchers find that an ingredient in common cough medicine improves multiple sclerosis symptoms in animal models.

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image: Putting Vaccines to the Test

Putting Vaccines to the Test

By | July 10, 2011

Gene expression analysis allows researchers to predict which patients will respond to flu vaccines and possibly expedite vaccine development.

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image: Cellular Salve

Cellular Salve

By | July 8, 2011

Ivan Martin talks about the promise of using cell-based therapies to regenerate joint cartilage.

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image: Summer Science, British Style

Summer Science, British Style

By | July 8, 2011

The Royal Society's annual science extravaganza packs some interesting stuff into 5 days of love and research.

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image: Synthetic Organ Transplant Success

Synthetic Organ Transplant Success

By | July 8, 2011

The recipient of the first synthetic organ transplant—a synthetic trachea seeded with the patient’s own stem cells—is sent home from the hospital.

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image: Korean Stem Cell Med for Sale

Korean Stem Cell Med for Sale

By | July 8, 2011

South Korea approves the first stem-cell medication for clinical use.

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image: Air Pollution Stunts Cognition

Air Pollution Stunts Cognition

By | July 6, 2011

Particulates in the air can cause impaired learning and depression in mice.

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