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» stem cells, culture and developmental biology

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The scientist was a member of a stem cell research team led by Nobel laureate Shinya Yamanaka. 

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Swearing is Good for You</em>

Book Excerpt from Swearing is Good for You

By Emma Byrne | January 24, 2018

In chapter 1, “The Bad Language Brain: Neuroscience and Swearing,” author Emma Byrne sets the scene for her book by telling the story of the hapless and potty-mouthed Phineas Gage.

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image: Image of the Day: Muscle Bouquet 

Image of the Day: Muscle Bouquet 

By The Scientist Staff | January 16, 2018

Lab-grown muscle stem cells from mice mimic the formation of muscle fibers in vivo. 

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image: Image of the Day: Van Gogh Microscopy

Image of the Day: Van Gogh Microscopy

By The Scientist Staff | January 10, 2018

Scientists identify the cells that give rise to the soft tissue cancer rhabdomyosarcoma. 

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image: Image of the Day: See You Later!

Image of the Day: See You Later!

By The Scientist Staff | January 8, 2018

Developmental biologists take a close look at how alligator embryos grow. 

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image: Coriell Institute CEO Dies

Coriell Institute CEO Dies

By Kerry Grens | January 4, 2018

Michael Christman oversaw the organization’s well-known biobank and pioneered a personalized medicine initiative.

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image: Alcohol Damages Mouse DNA

Alcohol Damages Mouse DNA

By Jef Akst | January 3, 2018

A byproduct of alcohol consumption causes mutations in the DNA of mouse blood stem cells, and some of the breaks are not repaired.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Jef Akst and Katarina Zimmer | January 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2018 issue of The Scientist.

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image: David Julius Probes the Molecular Mechanics of Pain

David Julius Probes the Molecular Mechanics of Pain

By Anna Azvolinsky | January 1, 2018

For nearly 30 years, the UC San Francisco researcher has delved into unexplored corners of the nervous system.

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After an initial wounding, genes needed for repair remain ready for action.

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