The Scientist

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Matching the immunological characteristics of donor retinal cells to those of the recipient can reduce the chance of rejection.

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Tips on how to surmount the challenges of working with CRISPR to manipulate genes in human stems cells to study their function in specific diseases or to correct genetic defects in patient cells.

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image: Stem Cells Drive Cancer Risk in Mice

Stem Cells Drive Cancer Risk in Mice

By | August 26, 2016

Mutations that arise during stem cell division contribute to the development of cancers in a variety of organs, according to a study.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: Zika Infects Adult Neural Progenitors Too

Zika Infects Adult Neural Progenitors Too

By | August 18, 2016

A mouse study shows that the virus has tropism for adult proliferative neural progenitor cells and immature neurons.

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image: NIH Reveals Plan to Fund Human-Animal Chimeras

NIH Reveals Plan to Fund Human-Animal Chimeras

By | August 4, 2016

The public gets to weigh in before the US government lifts its ban on such research.

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image: Nailing Down HAR Function

Nailing Down HAR Function

By | August 1, 2016

A remaining challenge in the study of human accelerated regions (HARs) is establishing their specific functions during development and other biological processes.

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