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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By Shawna Williams | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

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image: Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

By Ashley P. Taylor | October 23, 2017

Researchers identify 72 novel genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk.

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image: Image of the Day: Sun Burn

Image of the Day: Sun Burn

By The Scientist Staff | October 20, 2017

When certain melanocyte stem cells are exposed to UV rays, a molecular cascade can trigger melanoma, scientists find in mice.

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image: Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

By Catherine Offord | October 17, 2017

At low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T-cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling. 

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Plantings of non-GM refuges counter the development of resistance.

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A needle-free alternative to the finger-prick test would be a godsend for many sufferers of diabetes, but the industry has yet to clear the technological hurdles.

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image: Study Illuminates Genetics of Skin Color

Study Illuminates Genetics of Skin Color

By Ashley P. Taylor | October 12, 2017

Researchers identified genes related to melanin levels in African populations.

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Spark Therapeutics’s Luxturna would be the first approved therapy in the U.S. that replaces or repairs a defective gene inherited from one’s parents.

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image: Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

By The Scientist Staff | October 12, 2017

Scientists grew organoids that mimic human fetal brains and infected them with the Zika virus to model its neurological effects.

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