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image: Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

By | September 6, 2017

Sweet taste receptor-activating molecules produced by sinus microbes suppress the local innate immune system in humans.

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image: Bubbles for Broken Bones

Bubbles for Broken Bones

By | September 1, 2017

Ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles enable gene delivery to fix fractures.

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image: Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

By | September 1, 2017

Most didn’t believe French doctor Charles Louis Alphonse Laveran when he said he’d spotted the causative agent of the disease—and that it was an animal.

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image: Far-Out Science

Far-Out Science

By | September 1, 2017

How psychedelic drugs and infectious microbes alter brain function

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image: Ready, Set, Grow

Ready, Set, Grow

By | September 1, 2017

How to culture stem cells without depending on mouse feeder cells

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image: Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a surface protein on endosomes is key to the organelles’ uneven distribution in daughter cells.

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image: Decoding the Tripping Brain

Decoding the Tripping Brain

By | September 1, 2017

Scientists are beginning to unravel the mechanisms behind the therapeutic effects of psychedelic drugs.

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image: Infographic: The Brain on Psychedelics

Infographic: The Brain on Psychedelics

By | September 1, 2017

Understanding how hallucinogenic drugs affect different neural networks could shed light on their therapeutic potential.

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The new technique helped pig tibias heal in just eight weeks.

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image: Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a protein called Sara found on the surface of endosomes appears to be a key regulator of asymmetric splitting in fruit flies.

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