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The discovery reveals the role of a growth factor and endothelial cells in thymus repair, and could have implications for chemotherapy and radiation patients’ recovery following treatment.

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image: Editing Human Blood Vessel Cells with CRISPR

Editing Human Blood Vessel Cells with CRISPR

By | May 5, 2015

Researchers use the genome-editing tool to manipulate cultured human endothelial cells.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | January 1, 2014

Scientists come up with a better way to watch cells leave blood vessels.

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image: Michael Smith: Biomechanic

Michael Smith: Biomechanic

By | September 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Boston University. Age: 37

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image: Sensing a Little Tension

Sensing a Little Tension

By | September 1, 2013

Tools and techniques for measuring forces in living cells

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image: Engineered Hearts Beat

Engineered Hearts Beat

By | August 15, 2013

Human stem cells take up residence in mouse hearts stripped of their own components, restoring some of the organs’ function.

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