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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: The Energizer

The Energizer

By | May 1, 2014

György Hajnóczky uncovers the chemical and physical strategies by which mitochondria communicate and function within a cell.

3 Comments

image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: The Youngest Victims

The Youngest Victims

By | May 1, 2014

Linking single-gene defects to inflammatory bowel disease in young children may help all sufferers of the illness.

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image: Gene Therapy Researcher Faked Data

Gene Therapy Researcher Faked Data

By | April 25, 2014

A former postdoc in a prominent gene therapy lab is branded a fraud by the US government more than three years after having a slew of papers retracted from various journals.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review: April 21–25

Week in Review: April 21–25

By | April 25, 2014

Evolution of Y chromosome; delivering gene with “bionic ears”; diversity of an important cyanobacterium; charting genome-sequencing progress; blockbuster pharma deals

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image: Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

By | April 24, 2014

A marine cyanobacterium possesses astounding genomic diversity, yet still organizes into distinct subpopulations that have likely persisted for ages.

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image: Money Microbiome

Money Microbiome

By | April 24, 2014

Swabbing cash circulating in New York City reveals more than 3,000 different types of bacteria.

2 Comments

image: Cochlear Implant Gene Therapy

Cochlear Implant Gene Therapy

By | April 23, 2014

The surgically implanted device can be tweaked to provide short electric bursts that send a nerve-growing gene into local cells, a study on guinea pigs shows.

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image: Microbiome Influences

Microbiome Influences

By | April 22, 2014

Researchers find that gender, education level, and breastfeeding can affect humans’ commensal microbial communities.

2 Comments

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