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The Scientist

» gene therapy, microbiology and evolution

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Spark Therapeutics’s Luxturna would be the first approved therapy in the U.S. that replaces or repairs a defective gene inherited from one’s parents.

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image: Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

By Mikhail Tikhonov | October 12, 2017

Empirical data and humans’ biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the microscale.

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image: Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

By Ashley Yeager | October 11, 2017

Vaginal birth leads to changes in the development of offsprings’ microbiomes not seen among mice born via C-section, which researchers suspect might contribute to the weight differences.

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image: Plague Ravaging Madagascar

Plague Ravaging Madagascar

By Kerry Grens | October 10, 2017

Nearly four dozen people have died.

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Critics of the proposed curriculum say it leaves out important information relating to climate change and evolution.

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image: Nonviral CRISPR Delivery a Success

Nonviral CRISPR Delivery a Success

By Abby Olena | October 2, 2017

Researchers use gold nanoparticles to deliver CRISPR-Cas9 and correct a point mutation in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Aggie Mika | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

By Andrew F. Read and Peter J. Kerr | October 1, 2017

Emerging infections provide clues about how pathogens might evolve when farm animals are protected from infection.

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image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By Andrew F. Read and Peter J. Kerr | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

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image: In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

By Ashley P. Taylor | September 28, 2017

Embedded within 3.95-billion-year-old rock, scientists have found graphite with a carbon signature that indicates biological activity.

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