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image: Stem Cell Trial Data Mostly Go Unpublished

Stem Cell Trial Data Mostly Go Unpublished

By | May 5, 2017

Less than half of completed stem cell studies in humans are published in peer-reviewed journals, according to an analysis of regenerative medicine trials. 

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image: More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees’ reproduction and honey bees’ ability to fly.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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image: Image of the Day: Tail Eyes

Image of the Day: Tail Eyes

By | April 3, 2017

Following treatment with a migraine drug, blind tadpoles were able to process visual information through eyes transplanted onto their tails.

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image: Suicide Switch for Transplanted Stem Cells

Suicide Switch for Transplanted Stem Cells

By | March 2, 2017

Researchers use an inducible gene to limit tumor growth from human iPSCs transplanted into mice.

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image: Reprogramming Hair Cells

Reprogramming Hair Cells

By | February 22, 2017

Researchers isolate stem cells from the mouse cochlea and convert them into auditory hair cells, potentially paving the way for therapies to treat hearing loss.

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image: “Waviness” Protects Nerves When Whale Mouths Stretch

“Waviness” Protects Nerves When Whale Mouths Stretch

By | February 21, 2017

Rorqual whales’ mouths can stretch to more than double their length without causing damage, thanks to two layers of neuronal coiling. 

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image: Cytoskeletons Direct Hydra Regeneration

Cytoskeletons Direct Hydra Regeneration

By | February 10, 2017

Although hydra are known for regenerating even under the most dire circumstances, disrupting their cytoskeletal structures can interfere with the process, scientists show.

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