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image: Octophilosophy

Octophilosophy

By Katherine Bagley | September 1, 2011

When it comes to studying cephalopod brains and behavior, it helps to have a philosopher around.

30 Comments

image: What Price Kindness?

What Price Kindness?

By Oren Harman | September 1, 2011

Exposing the life and work of a visionary and troubled scientist opens a window onto the evolution of altruism.

42 Comments

image: Top 7 in Evolutionary Biology

Top 7 in Evolutionary Biology

By Jef Akst | August 29, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in evolutionary biology, from Faculty of 1000

0 Comments

image: 86 Percent of Eukaryotes Undiscovered

86 Percent of Eukaryotes Undiscovered

By Jef Akst | August 24, 2011

A new estimate of eukaryotic diversity suggests a total of 8.7 million species. So far, scientists have discovered only 1.2 million of them.

0 Comments

image: Beer Yeast Identified

Beer Yeast Identified

By Jef Akst | August 23, 2011

A new yeast species found in Patagonia appears to be the missing half of the long-used lager yeast.

3 Comments

image: New Oldest Fossils

New Oldest Fossils

By Jef Akst | August 22, 2011

Fossils discovered in Australian rocks may be the remnants of three and a half billion-year-old microorganisms.

3 Comments

image: Oldest Known Wood

Oldest Known Wood

By Jef Akst | August 12, 2011

Two newly described fossils suggest that wood is some 10 million years older than previous believed.

3 Comments

image: Yeast Don't Need Oxygen

Yeast Don't Need Oxygen

By Bob Grant | August 11, 2011

Scientists discover that ancestors of the unicellular fungi can synthesize essential biomolecules with only trace levels of O2.

27 Comments

image: Why Have Twins?

Why Have Twins?

By Jef Akst | August 11, 2011

Mothers more likely to have twins have heavier, healthier non-twin babies, possibly explaining why twinning evolved.

6 Comments

image: Rewriting <em>E. coli</em>’s Genetic Code

Rewriting E. coli’s Genetic Code

By Sabine Louët | August 5, 2011

Researchers use directed evolution to create a bacterial strain that substitutes a synthetic base for thymine.

6 Comments

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