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image: Parasites Unite!

Parasites Unite!

By | February 1, 2011

Gabriele Sorci discusses how invaders can band together to more effectively infect hosts.

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Losers Fight Back

By | February 1, 2011

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2011

February 2011's selection of notable quotes

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Appealing Choice

By | January 1, 2011

A book is born from pondering why sexual selection was, for so long, a minor component of evolutionary biology.

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Eau de Choice

By | January 1, 2011

Evolutionary biologist Jane Hurst at the University of Liverpool has found that male mice have evolved a cunning trick to distinguish themselves within the dating pool: they produce a specific protein that drives female attraction to male scent, and this molecule, called darcin, helps females remember a specific male's odor.

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Garage Innovation

By | January 1, 2011

The potential costs of regulating synthetic biology must be counted against putative benefits.

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image: Mining Bacterial Small Molecules

Mining Bacterial Small Molecules

By | January 1, 2011

As much as rainforests or deep-sea vents, the human gut holds rich stores of microbial chemicals that should be mined for their pharmacological potential.

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Basophil Roles

By | January 1, 2011

Editor's choice in Immunology

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Intestinal Molecular Signaling

By | January 1, 2011

Microbes, both good and bad, can exert direct effects on host cells and vice versa. 

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image: The Evolution of Volvox

The Evolution of Volvox

By | January 1, 2011

The volvocine algae are a model system for studying the evolution of multicellularity, as the group contains extant species ranging from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to a variety of colonial species and the full-fledged multicellular Volvox varieties.

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