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image: The Benefits of Trepidation

The Benefits of Trepidation

By Abigail Marsh | November 1, 2017

While wiping fear from our brains may seem attractive, the emotion is an essential part of our behavioral repertoire.

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image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By Philip Jaekl | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.

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image: To Each His Own

To Each His Own

By Mary Beth Aberlin | November 1, 2017

Every human brain is far more unique, adaptable, and vulnerable than ever suspected.

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image: Why Are Some People Altruistic?

Why Are Some People Altruistic?

By The Scientist Staff | November 1, 2017

Researcher Abigail Marsh tells the tale of her very personal brush with extreme altruism.

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image: Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity

Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity

By Sara B. Linker, Tracy A. Bedrosian, and Fred H. Gage | November 1, 2017

No two neurons are alike. What does that mean for brain function?

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image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.

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image: Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

By The Scientist Staff | October 31, 2017

Researchers have used a modified rabies virus and fluorescent proteins to tag individual nerve cells in the mouse visual cortex. 

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Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

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image: Image of the Day: Fear Center

Image of the Day: Fear Center

By The Scientist Staff | October 26, 2017

A set of neurons in the brain’s central amygdala plays a key role in forming memories of aversive experiences, scientists find in mice.  

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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