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image: Motor Man

Motor Man

By Anna Azvolinsky | September 1, 2017

Ron Vale has spent a career studying how molecular motors transport cargo within cells. He’s also developed tools to help scientists communicate their findings.

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image: Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

By Shawna Williams | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a surface protein on endosomes is key to the organelles’ uneven distribution in daughter cells.

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image: Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

By Shawna Williams | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a protein called Sara found on the surface of endosomes appears to be a key regulator of asymmetric splitting in fruit flies.

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image: The Role of DNA Base Modifications

The Role of DNA Base Modifications

By Skirmantas Kriaucionis | September 1, 2017

Researchers are just beginning to scratch the surface of how several newly recognized epigenetic changes function in the genome.

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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By Ashley P. Taylor | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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image: Fascinated by Folding

Fascinated by Folding

By Anna Azvolinsky | August 4, 2017

Lila Gierasch uses biochemical tools to understand how linear chains of amino acids turn into complex three-dimensional structures.

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A new method stimulates B cells to make human antigen-specific antibodies, obviating the need for vaccinating blood donors or hunting for rare B cells.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By Emily Monosson | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By Emily Monosson | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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