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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By Jef Akst | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By Kerry Grens | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By The Scientist Staff | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By Ruth Williams | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By Karen Zusi | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By Bob Grant | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By Karen Zusi | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Embracing the Unknown

Embracing the Unknown

By Jamie Holmes | November 1, 2015

Researchers are showing that ambiguity can be essential to brain development.

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By Kerry Grens | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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