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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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The artist discusses music as a means to get kids excited about science, and the inspiration he took from astrophysics and polar bears.

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image: Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

By | October 12, 2017

Empirical data and humans’ biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the microscale.

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image: U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

By | October 12, 2017

The decision to leave the United Nations’ educational, scientific, and cultural agency was spurred by what American officials say is the organization’s anti-Israel bias and lack of commitment to reform.

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image: Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

By | October 12, 2017

Scientists grew organoids that mimic human fetal brains and infected them with the Zika virus to model its neurological effects.

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image: Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

By | October 11, 2017

Vaginal birth leads to changes in the development of offsprings’ microbiomes not seen among mice born via C-section, which researchers suspect might contribute to the weight differences.

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image: Plague Ravaging Madagascar

Plague Ravaging Madagascar

By | October 10, 2017

Nearly four dozen people have died.

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Damage Patroller

Damage Patroller

By | October 1, 2017

Stephen Elledge has built a career studying how eukaryotic cells maintain genomic integrity.

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