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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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image: Image of the Day: Liver Buds

Image of the Day: Liver Buds

By | June 16, 2017

Using human induced pluripotent stem cells, scientists grew liver organoids and studied gene expression patterns in individual cells to learn more about how these tissues develop. 

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

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image: Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

By | June 1, 2017

In the 1960s, immunologists took matters into their own hands—and under their own skin—to characterize an immunoglobulin involved in allergies.

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image: Infographic: A Body Without Food

Infographic: A Body Without Food

By | June 1, 2017

Mounting evidence suggests that intermittent fasting causes significant changes to various organs and tissue types.

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image: Infographic: Immune Irritation in the Gut

Infographic: Immune Irritation in the Gut

By | June 1, 2017

A look at how gluten affects patients with celiac disease

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Sangamo Therapeutics will use zinc finger nucleases to introduce the gene for a missing clotting factor into the livers of men with hemophilia B.

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image: Mouse Livers Grow and Shrink Daily

Mouse Livers Grow and Shrink Daily

By | May 4, 2017

Feeding-fasting rhythms and light-dark cycles direct regular changes in organ and cell size, as well as ribosome number and protein levels.

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