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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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Life Scientists Honored

By | November 9, 2015

Breakthrough Prizes of $3 million each go to five researchers in the life sciences, recognizing their pioneering work in optogenetics, disease-associated mutation analyses, and ancient DNA sequencing.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Remote Mind Control

Remote Mind Control

By | November 1, 2015

Using chemogenetic tools to spur the brain into action

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Electrode-Free Electrophysiology

By | October 22, 2015

Optogenetics has evolved beyond its neuron-stimulating capacities to an all-optical approach for both manipulating and recording cells.

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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image: Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

By | October 5, 2015

Researchers have selectively activated a specific neural pathway to manipulate a primate’s behavior.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

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