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» optogenetics and developmental biology

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: The Brain on Fear

The Brain on Fear

By | June 25, 2015

Scientists uncover the neurons in the mouse brain responsible for linking the sight of a looming object to scared behavior.

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image: Optogenetics Meets CRISPR

Optogenetics Meets CRISPR

By | June 15, 2015

Researchers in Japan have developed a photoactivatable Cas9 nuclease to control CRISPR-based gene editing with the flip of a switch.

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image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: <em>TS</em> Picks: May 13, 2015

TS Picks: May 13, 2015

By | May 13, 2015

Profiles edition

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image: Mouse Mind Control

Mouse Mind Control

By | May 4, 2015

Researchers use chemicals to manipulate the behavior of mice.

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