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image: Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body

Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body

By | January 1, 2018

The acute pain that results from injury or disease is very different from chronic pain.

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Researchers find consistent behaviors and brain activity in an international study.

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image: Sex Differences in Opioid Analgesia: A Complicated Picture

Sex Differences in Opioid Analgesia: A Complicated Picture

By | January 1, 2018

Researchers are beginning to tease apart the mechanisms underlying differences in how males and females respond to powerful painkillers.

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image: Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

By | January 1, 2018

The race to develop analgesic drugs that inhibit sodium channel NaV1.7 is revealing a complex sensory role for the protein.

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image: Why Swearing and Pain Go Hand in Hand

Why Swearing and Pain Go Hand in Hand

By | January 1, 2018

Screaming obscenities when you stub your toe makes perfect biological sense.

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image: Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready

Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready

By | January 1, 2018

Decades after their discovery by bioprospectors, amphibian-derived analgesics continue to attract scientific attention.

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image: Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

By | January 1, 2018

Arachnids harbor a plentiful array of molecules that target mammalian pain receptors.

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image: Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

By | January 1, 2018

Studying cone snail venom has yielded novel pain pathways, but the peptides that function as toxins are difficult to translate into drugs.

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image: Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

By | January 1, 2018

Venomous centipedes may harbor a clue to the creation of a successful pain-killing compound for humans.

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image: Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

By | January 1, 2018

Compounds in the arachnids’ venom interact with ion channels to both cause and block pain.

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