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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: How Bacteria Eat Penicillin

How Bacteria Eat Penicillin

By Shawna Williams | April 30, 2018

Scientists work out the specific genes and biochemical steps required for digesting the very drugs designed to kill microbes.

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Rather than getting a gene for its original function, a horizontal gene transfer provides the raw material for evolutionary innovation.

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Drug-free environments, such as a designated ward in a hospital, might reduce the strength of selection for resistance.

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image: Image of the Day: Ant Attack!

Image of the Day: Ant Attack!

By The Scientist Staff | April 24, 2018

A new species of ant discovered in Borneo fends off invaders with a uniquely suicidal strategy.

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image: How Kidney Cancer Evolves

How Kidney Cancer Evolves

By Jim Daley | April 18, 2018

Renal cell carcinoma tumors have three different evolutionary fates, each associated with specific clinical outcomes.

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Authors of a new study suggest that 520-million-year-old structures, previously identified as the brains of ancient arthropods, are instead preserved microbial biofilms.

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image: Robert Baker, Bat Biologist, Dies

Robert Baker, Bat Biologist, Dies

By Diana Kwon | April 5, 2018

The Texas Tech University professor also investigated the effects of the Chernobyl disaster on surrounding wildlife.

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image: Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

By The Scientist Staff | April 4, 2018

Proteins and RNA aggregate into “membraneless organelles” due to liquid-liquid phase separation.

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image: Image of the Day: Four Eyes

Image of the Day: Four Eyes

By The Scientist Staff | April 3, 2018

Ancient monitor lizards had an extra set of “eyes” on top of their heads.

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