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» yeast and developmental biology

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image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

1 Comment

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: Calorie-Restricted Yeast Live Longer

Calorie-Restricted Yeast Live Longer

By | July 14, 2015

Calorie restriction in the organism extends lifespan, supporting a long-standing view that had been challenged by a study published last year.

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image: How to Make a New Species

How to Make a New Species

By | July 1, 2015

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.

3 Comments

image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

1 Comment

image: Human Genes Can Save Yeast

Human Genes Can Save Yeast

By | May 21, 2015

Replacing yeast genes with their human equivalents reveals functional conservation despite a billion years of divergent evolution.

2 Comments

image: Yeast–Made Opioid Progresses

Yeast–Made Opioid Progresses

By | May 19, 2015

Scientists are one step closer to coaxing engineered yeast to produce morphine from a simple sugar.

1 Comment

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