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The switch from maternal factors involves dynamic reprogramming of the zygotic genome.

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New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.

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From analyses of surface protein evolution to tweets on social media, scientists are gathering all the data they can to accurately predict influenza dynamics.

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image: Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

By The Scientist Staff | November 28, 2017

Scientists study the development of scales in skate embryos. 

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image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By The Scientist Staff | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By The Scientist Staff | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By Claire Asher | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By Claire Asher | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By Kerry Grens | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

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image: CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

By Ashley P. Taylor | September 20, 2017

OCT4 is necessary for blastocyst formation in the human embryo, researchers report.

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