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image: Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

By Jef Akst | August 9, 2011

More than 100 researchers have left a neuroscience institute in Brazil in the last couple of weeks, protesting managerial problems they say are thwarting their work.

21 Comments

image: Rats Don't Map Altitude

Rats Don't Map Altitude

By Jef Akst | August 8, 2011

Rat neurons only weakly respond as the animals climbed upwards, suggesting the brain's map of the environment doesn't account for altitude.

9 Comments

image: Rewriting <em>E. coli</em>’s Genetic Code

Rewriting E. coli’s Genetic Code

By Sabine Louët | August 5, 2011

Researchers use directed evolution to create a bacterial strain that substitutes a synthetic base for thymine.

6 Comments

image: How Vampire Bats Find Veins

How Vampire Bats Find Veins

By Jessica P. Johnson | August 4, 2011

Heat-sensing protein channels in vampire bats allow the flying mammals to find the best place to sink their teeth into their prey.

12 Comments

image: Estrogen’s New Role

Estrogen’s New Role

By Jessica P. Johnson | August 2, 2011

The well-studied hormone functions as a neurotransmitter in the brains of zebra finches.

0 Comments

image: Anti-evolution Vandals?

Anti-evolution Vandals?

By Edyta Zielinska | August 1, 2011

Pro-evolution bumper stickers and emblems are being removed from the cars of biologists in Florida.

72 Comments

image: Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

By Tom Curran | August 1, 2011

Sequencing the DNA of individual neurons is a way to dissect the genes underlying major neurological and psychological disorders.

6 Comments

image: Memory Aid

Memory Aid

By Richard P. Grant | August 1, 2011

Editor's Choice in Neuroscience

3 Comments

image: Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

By Hannah Waters | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, a restless Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859 to study art and marine biology. The diversity of life fascinated the 26-year-old Prussian, and in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the

21 Comments

image: An Unlichenly Pair

An Unlichenly Pair

By Hannah Waters | August 1, 2011

A young botanist pays tribute to his mentor by naming a newly discovered, rare species in his honor.

0 Comments

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