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image: Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

By | February 1, 2017

Nonliving cells developed in the lab can communicate chemically with living bacteria, according to a study.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

By | January 23, 2017

Researchers generate an organism that can replicate artificial base pairs indefinitely.

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image: Top Technical Advances 2016

Top Technical Advances 2016

By | December 15, 2016

The year’s most impressive achievements include methods to watch translation in cells, trace cell fates, avoid mitochondrial mutations, edit DNA, and build antibiotics from scratch.

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image: Synthetic Sensors

Synthetic Sensors

By | December 1, 2016

Engineered circuits detect endogenous transcription factors to drive cellular outputs.

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image: Infographic: How to Build a Synthetic Sensor

Infographic: How to Build a Synthetic Sensor

By | December 1, 2016

Scientists designed a genetic sensor-and-readout system, based on detecting a transcription factor, that performs a custom cellular activity.

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Researchers are using the tissue, synthesized with human pluripotent stem cells and implanted into mice, to study a rare form of Hirschprung’s disease.

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image: Church on the Late Show

Church on the Late Show

By | October 1, 2016

Harvard biologist George Church talks gene therapy, aging, and reviving the woolly mammoth with Stephen Colbert.

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image: Curious George

Curious George

By | October 1, 2016

George Church has consistently positioned himself at genomics’ leading edge.

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image: Streamlining the <em>E. coli</em> Genetic Code

Streamlining the E. coli Genetic Code

By | August 18, 2016

Scientists design a bacterial genome with only 57 codons.

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